Results: Should Your Price Tag Include or Leave Off the Zeros?

Should Your Price Tag Include or Leave Off the Zeros?

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Difference Between Versions:

Version AWith zeros after the dollar amount ($19.00)

Version B Without zeros after the dollar amount ($19)


Key Performance Indicator (KPI): 

Add to cart clicks, Visits/Orders, Revenue Per Visitor (RPV)


Test Goal:

Increase jewellery sales

 

Traffic Source: 

All: direct, search, referral, organic, paid, affiliate, email list, and social

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Test Run By

Blue Acorn iCi

Test Run On

Visual Website Optimizer (VWO)

WINNING VERSION

B

Poll Results - The Best Guesses:

Should Your Price Tag Include or Leave Off the Zeros?

  • Version B
  • Version A
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Test Details:

Blue Acorn, a digital commerce agency committed to increasing revenue for their B2C and B2B clients, ran this pricing study for a jewellery fashion brand.


Background & Testing Goal:

The testing team wanted to know if shoppers associated item cost with the length of the price tag. To test, all the non-significant zeros after the dollar amount were removed on all applicable products across the site.


Hypothesis:

The team suspected removing the zeros would make the price look less expensive, so visitors would be more likely to purchase.

However, the team wondered if removing the zeros could backfire, making the product look less valuable.


 

 

 

 

Poll Results - The Best Guesses:

Should Your Price Tag Include or Leave Off the Zeros?

  • Version B
  • Version A
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COMMENTS: Tell Us Your Thoughts.

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By: Deborah O'MalleyShari AltmanAdsla Recent comment authors
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Adsla
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Each of them had two prices with no explanation why. I guess the one with the zeroes figuring that one price was a discount over the other price in red. Like the analysis said, with a discount it could help to use the zeroes. I guess it wasn’t a discount after all.

Shari Altman
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Shari Altman

The principle here applies to prices with cents as well such as $19.95 where ideally the cents are superscript so that visually you don’t notice the cents. Same idea as not showing the zeros of a price.

In this example the original price with slash is a problem as the slash should be red but the price not. The red price is calling more attention to itself than the actual discounted price.

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