Results: With Or Without the “Add to Cart” Buttons?

Without "Add to Cart" buttons

Click here to enlarge

With "Add to Cart" buttons

Click here to enlarge

With Or Without the "Add to Cart" Buttons?

Loading ... Loading ...

Difference Between Versions:

Version A: Without “Add to Cart” buttons on category pages
Version B: 
With “Add to Cart” buttons that had “quickview” functionality


Key Performance Indicator (KPI): 

Revenue Per Visitor (RPV)

Test Goal:

Increase the number of people adding items to cart and making purchases

Traffic Source: 

All desktop traffic - primarily male (52%), returning visitors (55%), aged 25-44 years (60%)

Sign-up now to get free, gamified A/B tests and more helpful content delivered to you each week.

Become a Better Digital Marketer

Get full access to all A/B tests, plus helpful articles, interviews, and resources to optimize your digital marketing success. Become a Pro Member

Get Your A/B Test Featured!

Submit your A/B test and see it showcased on the site. You'll get a great case study write-up, your logo prominently featured, linkbacks to your site, and social media promo, giving you with valuable, free brand exposure. Submit Your Study
This week’s Featured Test is brought to you by:

Test Run By

Elite SEM

Test Run For

U.S. Polo Assn.

Test Run On

Convert.com

WINNING VERSION

B

Poll Results - The Best Guesses:

With Or Without the "Add to Cart" Buttons?

  • Version B
  • Version A
Loading ... Loading ...

Test Details:

For U.S Polo Assn. — a brand that’s been around since 1890 — staying relevant in the digital age is key. That’s why they turned to the award-winning digital optimization agency, Elite SEM, to test what’s best to increase online conversions.


Background:

Looking to lift product purchases, Elite SEM’s testing team questioned whether adding “Add to Cart” buttons on U.S. Polo’s category pages would make it easier for shoppers to directly choose products, enabling quicker, easier checkout.

The team figured shoppers with high purchase intent, or those really interested in buying the brand, would appreciate a simplified user experience.

Including an “Add to Cart” button meant shoppers could get a “quickview” of the items in their cart and promptly purchase — without needing to go through a drawn out checkout process.

The quickview functionality allowed users to easily select size and color, all in one spot, without needing to sift through different sections of the website. The functionality essentially eliminated extra steps in the conversion funnel.


Hypothesis:

The team suspected adding “Add to Cart” buttons, with quickview functionality, would increase the number of shoppers adding products to their carts, ultimately resulting in more completed transactions and higher Revenue Per Visitor (RPV).

However, the team also acknowledged creating shopping shortcuts could make sales fall short. So, decided to test the best approach.


Test Set-Up:

To determine the effect of adding “Add to Cart” buttons on the category pages, an A/B test was set-up and run on Convert Experiments.

Over 38 days, a total of 26 thousand visitors saw either the version without or with the “Add to Cart” buttons. Traffic was split equally across both variations.

The original version, without the “Add to Cart” buttons, looked like this:

The variant with the “Add to Cart” buttons looked like this:

Revenue Per Visitor (RPV) was calculated across both versions.


The Real-Life Result:

Winner: Version B – with the added “Add To Cart” buttons, added up to be the strong winner.

Compared to the original version, including the “Add to Cart” buttons increased RPV 11%. Results achieved 90% confidence.


Analysis:

This test isn’t just about adding “Add to Cart” buttons and calling it a day.

It’s about creating a simplified user experience which makes the checkout process easier and quicker for users.

Including the “Add to Cart” buttons, with quickview functionality, eliminated extra steps in the conversion funnel.

It meant that, rather than needing to click several layers deep into the site to, let’s say select a shirt, shoppers could instead, at a glance, select the product, choose their size, put the item in their cart, and keep shopping.

The process looked like this:

Step #1: View Product and “Add To Cart”:

Step #2: Select size, quantity, “Add to Cart”, keep shopping:

As a result, high intent shoppers, who already knew they wanted to make a purchase, could do so quickly, easily, and without hardly needing to think about it.

The process was seamless and there were less friction points. So, adding additional items to the cart became a no-brainer, increasing visitors purchases, leading to higher RPV.

So, does this result mean you too should add “Add to Cart” buttons to your eCommerce site?

Not necessarily.

Simply adding the buttons may not do anything if the “quickview functionality” and user experience isn’t optimized to go with it. In fact, just adding the buttons could create confusion or distraction, since it may create visual clutter, or take up valuable space on an important area of site.

As well, if your shoppers aren’t high intent, they may not be ready to convert right away. Lower intent visitors, or those less determined to make a purchase, may need a more drawn out sales process to learn the details, attributes, and benefits of your product — before becoming ready to convert.

In this test, it’s important to note, more than half (55%) of shoppers were return visitors. They’d been to the site before, likely poking around, glancing at the products, and deciding to later, maybe come back, and buy something.

The “Add to Cart” button appealed to these return visitors who knew what they wanted to buy and were now ready to quickly pull the trigger.

It likely wouldn’t have worked so well if the site was mostly made up of new visitors who were unfamiliar with the product, and needed to gather important details before feeling ready and confident to buy.


Ultimate Takeaway & Immediate Application:

1. It’s not just about buttons

Enhancing the user experience isn’t just about adding or removing buttons. It’s about creating a simplified process that most easily enables web visitors to complete the transaction and move through the funnel.

2. It’s about your audience and their needs

To ensure an optimal user experience, assess your audience and their needs. Are they predominantly new visitors? Mostly return visitors? Do they have high intent? Low intent? These factors will determine how much information your users need to confidently move through your conversion funnel. And, consequently, how short or drawn out you should make your funnel, so it optimally converts.

In the end, it’s always best to test!

Want full access to more, helpful case studies like this one? Click here to become a Pro Member:
Unlock Pro Membership Access

Poll Results - The Best Guesses:

With Or Without the "Add to Cart" Buttons?

  • Version B
  • Version A
Loading ... Loading ...

Sign-up now to get free, gamified A/B tests and more helpful content delivered to you each week.

Become a Better Digital Marketer

Get full access to all A/B tests, plus helpful articles, interviews, and resources to optimize your digital marketing success. Become a Pro Member

Test Run By

Elite SEM

Test Run For

U.S. Polo Assn.

Test Run On

Convert.com